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Online dating is thriving in lockdown: who knew quarantine was so good for your love life?

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Megan Murray
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Dating apps have reported that we’re having longer conversations and more meaningful connections… is lockdown what a generation of mindless swipers needed?

For a long time now, online dating has a had a bad reputation. Dating apps tend to carry the connotations, especially for people who haven’t actually used them, of disposability and failing to get to know someone properly before moving onto the next match.

Of course, everybody’s experience is different and some incredible relationships have been born out of the likes of Tinder, Happn and Bumble – but there’s no denying that dating apps can often feel like hard work because of the sense that everyone’s talking to a plethora of other people. 

So, who would have thought that in a time of country-wide lockdown, when blossoming romances are being stopped short (unless you make the decision to isolate together, that is), we’re actually managing to make more genuine connections?

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Dating apps across the board are reporting increasingly positive findings since the beginning of quarantine, showing that people are making deeper connections and having longer conversations than they would if they could meet up straight away.

Happn, the dating app known for matching you with people you’ve crossed paths with, has said that in a survey of its users 73% said that the isolation period is helping them make a stronger connection online, while 45% have said that their conversations are more detailed and emotional.

Similarly, Badoo has seen an increase in length of conversations which suggest people are taking the time to get to know each other while stuck at home.

Natasha Briefel, UK brand marketing director of Badoo unpicks the findings, saying: “Whilst self-distancing or even self-isolating is a challenging thing to do, doing so when you’re single and perhaps even living alone, is even harder. Online dating is not always an easy world to navigate, but the increased isolation initially may make the idea of building a meaningful connection feel even further from reach.”

Real life dates, remember them?

Speaking to Stylist.co.uk, Emma Jones, a singleton living in London, agrees and explains that her dating life hasn’t remotely slowed down since self-isolating and that video chats have become the norm for her. “I’ve done three video dates already since last week and it’s so fun, I’m honestly so excited about it,” she says.

“I think this time is giving us the chance to get to know people better and for now it might be stopping people seeing someone once and then ghosting them… although who knows if it will last,” she adds.

But if you’ve been finding dating difficult in lockdown, you’re not alone. Although the reports above show that apps are working for some, there’s plenty of people who are finding isolation dating behaviour negative. Here’s three articles that might help:

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Images: Getty / Unsplash

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Megan Murray

Megan Murray is a digital journalist for stylist.co.uk, who enjoys writing about London happenings, beautiful places, delicious morsels and generally spreading sparkle wherever she can.

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