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Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

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It's been over fifty years since the blockbuster film Pillow Talk, starring Doris Day and Rock Hudson, first came onto our film screens and this May the all-singing romantic comedy is back. Re-issued on Digibook Blu-ray for the first time since 1959 and with all of the original elements restored, thousands of new viewers will be able to see the Oscar-winning movie for the first time, complete with timeless tunes and scene-stealing performances.

To celebrate, we've got our hands on some exclusive artwork from the original film. From vintage prints to Pop Art-inspired posters, they bring the golden era of cinema to life in wonderful detail. Simply click on an image to launch the gallery and let us know your thoughts on Twitter or in the comments section below.

Pillow Talk is released on Limited Edition Digibook Blu-ray on 7 May to celebrate Universal Pictures’ 100th Anniversary

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The official American poster for Pillow Talk shows Rock Hudson and Doris Day locked in a passionate embrace. Pillow Talk was the first film to star Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Tony Randall all together. It was followed by Lover Come Back and Send Me No Flowers.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    Rock Hudson turned down the rom com three times before he accepted, believing the script (which sees a man attempt to woo a woman he despises in real life by disguising his voice over a shared telephone line) to be "too risqué".

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    Doris Day, meanwhile, was always set on playing the part of interior decorator, Jan Morrow.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The tagline for Pillow Talk is the provocative sell, "It's what goes on when the lights go off!"

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    It's hard to believe it now, but at the time this film was produced, its writer, Ross Hunter, found that no theatre managers wanted to book it. Popular film themes in the late fifties were westerns, war films and huge spectacles - Pillow Talk was none of these.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The theatre managers that refused to book the film insisted that Rock Hudson and Doris Day were yesterday's stars. However, they were proven wrong when the film went onto be the second highest grossing movie of the 1950s.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The comedy brought in a staggering domestic box-office gross of $18,750,000 upon release.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    Doris Day was nominated for best actress at the 1960s Oscars for Pillow Talk. She did not win and it remains her only nomination for the award.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The film did, however, scoop the Academy Award for best writing (original screenplay) at the 1960s ceremony.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    Spanish TV first screened Pillow Talk on 20 July 1969 while everybody was watching the Apollo land on the Moon. Suddenly, the film stopped and Spanish people could see the landing directly. The film was not re-shown on TV until 1999, when Spanish viewers could, at last, see the conclusion.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The film's director, Michael Gordon, had hoped to make a sequel to Pillow Talk in 1980. It was to star Kristy McNichol as Jan and Brad Allen's daughter and Gregory Harrison as her boyfriend. Unfortunately, Gordon was unable to lure Doris Day out of retirement to make the film.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    In 2009, Pillow Talk was named to the US National Film Registry by the Library of Congress for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The 2003 film Down with Love parodies elements of Pillow Talk, with both movies exploring feminist themes of the late 50s/early 60s.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    Doris Day sings three songs in the film: Pillow Talk during the opening credits, Roly Poly in the piano bar with Rock Hudson, and Possess Me on the drive up to Jonathan's (Tony Randall's) cabin.

  • Pillow Talk: exclusive artwork

    The movie is shot in New York and according to the NY Times, conveys a "splendid montage" of the city.

    It remains Rock Hudson and Doris Day's most successful collaboration.

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