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Delights of womanhood: real women share the weird and wonderful things men are missing out on

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Kayleigh Dray
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Despite all the hard work of the suffragettes, feminists, and incredible women all over the world, there’s no point denying it; being a woman can seem like a pretty unattractive prospect at times.

First of all, there’s the gender pay gap to consider; it's a fact that UK women earn £300,000 less than men over their working lives.
 
Then there’s the glaring inequality between the sexes, the everyday sexism we're subjected to in public, and the inconvenience that is our period each month. Plus there’s the added sting of tampon tax to factor in, too.
 
But, despite this, there are some added perks to being a woman.
 
Taking to Reddit this week, a group of women have decided to school men on all of the “exclusively feminine things” that they are missing out on. 
 
And what they had to say was strangely enlightening.
 
Check it out:

Some men even felt compelled to join the thread, letting slip the "feminine" things they have been encouraged to try now that gender stereotypes and barriers are finally being broken down.

CommentWhat are some almost exclusively feminine things that guys are missing out on?

It’s a stark reminder of the fact that men have their own obstacles to face in modern society, one of the most destructive of which is the concept of ‘masculinity’ that they feel forced to subscribe to.
 
Joe Ehrmann, coach and former NFL player, previously said that “the three most destructive words that every man receives when he’s a boy is when he’s told to ‘be a man’.”
 
Those three words are just one of the messages that boys and men are sent on a daily basis; feelings are bad, muscles are good, being too nice is bad, insults are good, affection is bad, physical violence is good, and so on.
 
It is unsurprising, then, that so many men envy the ease with which women can open up to their friends and loved ones - or that women are so proud that of the fact that they don't have to justify being emotional to anyone.

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Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

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