Food

Gin cocktail recipes from Jim and Tonic (because it’s World Gin Day)

Gin cocktail recipes from Jim and Tonic to celebrate World Gin Day. 

It’s World Gin Day and what better way to celebrate than with a gin cocktail? The team at Jim and Tonic, believe it’s about time quality spirits and sustainability went hand in hand. Scroll down for two recipes to celebrate this day. 

Beaux 42

The Beaux 42 is one of Jim and Tonic’s top selling cocktails at their Grand Central themed cocktail bar menu at Mercato Metropolitano in Elephant and Castle, London. This drink is a rhubarb flavoured twist on a classic prohibition-era cocktail called the French 75, which is named after a 75 MM machine gun used in WWI. The French 75 is a classy drink that packs a punch. 

Best described as a strong drink in a sparkling dress. Designed to impress the French 75 or Beaux 42 is perfect for celebrations, pre-dinner drinks or any time a bubbly cocktail is in order.

To make this cocktail at home you will need:

  • A cocktail shaker (either a 3 piece cobbler or a Boston tin shaker)
  • A manual fruit juicer (Mexican elbow ideally)
  • A measuring cup
  • A fine strainer (tea strainer works just fine)
  • A fruit peeler
  • Fruit knife

Ingredients

  • 40ml of Rhubarb gin
  • One lemon
  • Sugar Syrup
  • Prosecco
  • Lavender sprig (optional)

Start off by making the sugar syrup (use two parts sugar to 1 part hot water) - I would suggest starting off with 1 cup of sugar to half cup water as we will only be using 15 ml of syrup per serve. Once all the sugar has fully dissolved, set the syrup on the side for cooling.

Next step, grab the fruit peeler and make a long beautiful lemon peel and set it on the side (this will be part of our garnish).

Next cut the peeled lemon in half and using the Mexican elbow go ahead and juice half of it Measure 20 ml fresh lemon juice and 15 ml of homemade sugar syrup and add them to the shaker (this creates acidity and balance to the drink giving it a lovely citrus zing).

Now it’s time to add the gin:

The gin you use will give your drink body and character, so it is important to use a gin that shines through the rest of the ingredients. We found the perfect match in our Jim and Tonic ‘Roobee’ Rhubarb Gin, which provides a subtle fruity character and also a lingering honey, rhubarb tart finish.

Go ahead and measure 40ml of gin and add it to the shaker.

Now add the ice to the shaker and close it tight. Give it a quick shake (5 seconds max), but be mindful that if you shake longer the drink will become over diluted.

Next open the shaker and using the fine strainer strain the liquid into a tall champagne flute (by using the fine strainer we stop all the small ice chips from landing in your drink causing further water dilution).

Top up the flute with Prosecco creating that lovely vibrant pink colour.

All that is left is to add the garnish:

Grab the lemon peel you’ve set aside in the beginning and using a fruit knife carve the edges and make a 2cm cut through the middle of it.

Next stick two lavender sticks through the incision and attach it all together to the rim of the glass.

As a final touch, just land a straw horizontally through the beautifully curved peel (as shown in the image below).

Jim and Tonic

Bee’s Knees

Now here’s a classic prohibition era cocktail that will leave you buzzing like a bee. The Bee’s Knees was originally designed in the US speakeasy scene of the 1920s when poor quality bathtub gin was widely spread and bartenders were inventing new methods and ways to mask the harsh flavour of the gin used. 

Now, one hundred years later the Bees Knees has been revitalized and besides being a gin lover’s favorite, it became a way for bartenders to shine their skill in pairing the right gin with the right honey. So instead of masking the flavor of the gin, it enhances it.

To make this cocktail at home you will need:

  • A cocktail shaker (either a 3 piece cobbler or a Boston tin shaker)
  • A manual fruit juicer (Mexican elbow if possible)
  • A measuring cup
  • A fine strainer (tea strainer works just fine)
  • A fruit peeler
  • Fruit knife
  • Ingredients
  • 50ml of gin
  • Honey
  • A lemon

Honey doesn’t mix well into cold liquids, so I would suggest starting off by making a simple honey syrup from equal parts honey and water. To make honey simple syrup, just warm up the two ingredients together on the stove until you can easily whisk them together. Leftover honey syrup will keep well in the refrigerator, covered, for up to two weeks.

Next step, grab the fruit peeler and make a long beautiful lemon peel and set it on the side (this will be part of our garnish).

Next, cut the peeled lemon in half and using the Mexican elbow and go ahead and juice half of it.

Measure 25ml fresh lemon juice and 20ml of homemade honey syrup and add them to the shaker.

Now it’s time to add the gin:

Picking the right gin is crucial as it will need to marry up well with the honey. For these two ingredients to pair together in the glass they will need to complement one another. So if you’re going for a poliflora honey, I suggest using a floral gin like Jim and Tonic ‘Fougere’ gin, which we distil with lavender and bergamot oils, or you can go more herbaceous by using Mercato Mediterranean gin with a lighter borage honey or rooney honey.

Pour 50ml of gin into the shaker.

Add ice to the shaker and close it tight. Give it a firm shake for about 10-15 seconds. Open the shaker and using the fine strainer strain the liquid into a coupe or Nick & Nora glass (by using the fine strainer we stop all the small ice chips from landing in your drink causing further water dilution).

All that is left is to add the garnish:

Grab the lemon peel you’ve set aside in the beginning and using a fruit knife carve the edges and make a 2cm cut through the middle of it. Then just curve and twist the peel gently and attach it to the rim of the glass.

pictures: Jim and Tonic