Food

Get set: glow in the dark doughnuts are here to brighten up your life

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Jasmine Andersson
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Doughnuts are simply a divine foodstuff that are too pure for this world.

If we’re not tampering with them to yield more taste sensations, then we’re simply letting ourselves down.

After macaron doughnutsgrilled cheese doughnuts and even sushi doughnuts came into our lives, we thought that we’d seen it all.

Cue the glow in the dark doughnut making a neon entrance, or as the whizzes in marketing have called it, the glownut.

The glow nut

Would you eat a neon doughnut?

The glow in the dark sweet stuffs, created by Australian company Black Star Pastry, are topped with yuzu icing packed with vitamin B. It’s the vitamin in question, rather than additives, that gives the doughnuts their glow.



“We thought it would be fun to see people with glow-in-the-dark icing all over their hands and faces, so doughnuts were the natural choice,” baker Christopher Té told Daily Mail Australia.

“We would never create anything that was unnatural, even if it was a great idea,” he said.

“Black Star is all about great techniques and real cooking, we never add dyes or additives to any of our products. We strictly adhered to this principle in order to make the glow in the dark doughnut happen.”

Glowing

Black Star Pastry have a range of glowing goods

And the glow in the dark delectables don’t stop there.

Glow in the dark white hot chocolate is on the café’s menu, as well as neon dough balls and cake.



Although for now, our Oceanic partners are the only ones who will receive the benefit.

The treats are going to be sold exclusively at Glow Cave Dessert Bar pop-up at Sydney’s Vivid festival, an outdoor art celebration in the city.

And while we wait for the sweet treats to make their way to the UK, we know one thing is for certain. Move over goth lattes – there’s a new food trend in town.

Photos: Black Star Pastry’s Instagram

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Jasmine Andersson

When she isn't talking about her emotional attachment to meal deals or serenading unfortunate individuals with David Bowie power solos in karaoke booths, Jasmine writes about gender, politics and culture as a freelance journalist. She wastes her days tweeting @the__chez  

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