Life

Science proves mothers and daughters have a stronger bond than any other relationship

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Sejal Kapadia Pocha
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Ever feel as if you're turning into your mother? 

Well, new research shows that similarities between mothers and daughters are more pronounced than any other relationship.

In a study to work out why depression and other mood disorders seem to be commonly passed on from mums to daughters, scientists found that the two share a structure of the brain that regulates emotions.

"This association was significantly greater than mother–son, father–daughter, and father–son associations," said researchers in The Journal of Neuroscience, who performed MRI scans on all members of 35 healthy families.

It means that women are more likely to understand and relate to the emotions of their mothers than anyone else, and vice versa. 

“Our study’s uniqueness,” lead author Fumiko Hoeft from University of California tells Scientific American, “is that we’re the first one to get the whole family and scan both parents and offspring to look at how similar their brain networks are.

"We joke about inheriting stubbornness or organisation—but we’ve never actually seen that in human brain networks before. [This research] was a proof of impact.”

The next time you call your mum to vent about a trying day, know that she really might be able to understand your emotions, more than anyone else. 

Here's to mums everywhere!

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Sejal Kapadia Pocha

Sejal Kapadia Pocha covers stories about everything from women’s issues to cult foods. She describes herself as a balance between Hermione and Luna Lovegood.

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