Will there be a second season of Making a Murderer?

Posted by
Harriet Hall

It’s the true crime documentary that’s taken the world by storm – people from all demographics have been glued to their TV, computer and tablet screens to watch the trial of Steven Avery unfold in front of them in Netflix’s Making a Murderer.

Well, fans who have finished the series and are pining for their next fix, might be about to get exactly what they want.

Makers of the show, Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi, have revealed that there could be a second season on the horizon.

Making a Murderer tells the story of Wisconsin-born Steven Avery who, after spending 18 year in jail for a crime he didn’t commit, was later tried and found guilty of the murder of another woman - Teresa Halbach.

The documentary dissects Avery’s trial in forensic detail, making viewers question the entire process of the American judicial system. The outrage caused by the show has even led to a petition – 444,286 signatures strong (at time of writing) – for President Obama to exonerate Avery.

The filmmakers, who are continuing to follow Avery’s case, say new footage could be included in possible future episodes.


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Speaking at the Television Critics Association press tour this week, Ricciardi said they'd had “several phone calls with Steven Avery which we have recorded with an eye toward including them in future episodes.”

“It’s real-life so you don’t know what’s going to happen. We are ready… if there are significant developments, we will be there,” added Demos.

At the same event, Netflix’s Chief Content Editor, Ted Serandos, said that they would “certainly take a look” at any future episodes that are made, as “the story is still unfolding.”

The filmmakers have received criticism from Wisconsin state prosecutor, Ken Kratz, for failing to adequately include all evidence, but Ricciardi has denied such accusations, saying:

“We used original footage captured at press conferences, at public forums,” and that Krazts declined “multiple opportunities” to be interviewed by them – either for the original series, or a possible follow-up.

25-year-old Teresa Hallbach was murdered in 2005

25-year-old Teresa Halbach was murdered in 2005

“We’re not prosecutors, we're not defense attorneys, we did not set out to convict or exonerate someone. We set out to examine the criminal justice system today,” says Ricciardi.

Although there is no confirmation yet of a second series, this is certainly a promising development.