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Don’t like the term feminist? Amy Schumer has a message for you

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Kayleigh Dray
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Amy Schumer has slammed women who do not define themselves as feminists.

Speaking in an interview with BBC Newsnight’s Emily Maitlis, the US-based comedian said: “I think anyone who is not a feminist is an insane person.

“I think they don’t know what feminism means.”

Schumer, who is currently in the UK as part of a tour, went on to define feminism for all those who remain unclear on what it means.

“It just means equality for women,” she said, “but I think that word has a whole different meaning for different people.

“So someone will say to me: 'You're not a feminist are you?'... Of course I am. Of course I want equal rights for women.”



The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo author finished: “Feminism is just about women having social, political and economic equality.

“I feel very comfortable speaking about myself as a comedian and a feminist because those are two things that I completely am. Those are two words that definitely define me.”

“I think anyone who is not a feminist is an insane person"

“I think anyone who is not a feminist is an insane person"

Schumer’s diatribe come just weeks after Sex And The City’s Sarah Jessica Parker admitted that she doesn’t identify as a feminist.

Speaking candidly, the real-life Carrie Bradshaw said: “I believe in women and I believe in equality, but I think there is so much that needs to be done that I don’t even want to separate it anymore.

“I’m so tired of separation. I just want people to be treated equally.”



While it shouldn’t feel that contentious, the term ‘feminist’ is one which many women – including celebrities – are reluctant to adopt.

“I’m so tired of separation. I just want people to be treated equally.”

“I’m so tired of separation. I just want people to be treated equally”

Some, such as Susan Sarandon and Madonna, have chosen instead to define themselves as a ‘humanist’ – a term that can be loosely translated as someone who has placed the welfare and happiness of all humans at the centre of their ethical decision-making.

However others, like Schumer, have insisted that feminism is an important part of their lives.

Lena Dunham, the creator of television show Girls, famously told the Metro: “Women saying ‘I’m not a feminist’ is my greatest pet peeve. Do you believe that women should be paid the same for doing the same jobs? Do you believe that women should be allowed to leave the house? Do you think that women and men both deserve equal rights?

“Great, then you’re a feminist. People think there is something taboo about speaking up for feminism."



Meanwhile Schumer, whilst discussing her feminist beliefs, added that she intends to move abroad if Donald Trump is elected US president over Hillary Clinton.

Explaining why she feels Clinton is so unpopular with many demographics, the comedian said that she feels the presidential candidate is being judged unfairly because she’s a woman.

“I feel very comfortable speaking about myself as a comedian and a feminist because those are two things that I completely am

“I feel very comfortable speaking about myself as a comedian and a feminist because those are two things that I completely am"

“I haven’t had a conversation with anyone who doesn’t like Hillary where they’ve had anything meaningful to say,” said Schumer. “I think she’s caught so much flack for so long now because she isn’t what they think of as a woman.

“They were mad she wasn’t making cookies, but she was like, ‘Oh no, I’m getting healthcare for every mother in the country.’

“They don’t like how she speaks or dresses. It’s everything except how she would be as president.”

Watch the full interview with Amy Schumer on BBC iPlayer now.

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Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

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