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Ashley Roberts releases emotional statement following her father’s suicide

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Kayleigh Dray
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SANTA MONICA, CA - MARCH 15: Ashley Roberts attends the Cinemagic Annual Gala at The Fairmont Miramar Hotel & Bungalows on March 15, 2018 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images)

“I’ve been in a state of shock, confusion, questioning, and pain so deep in my guts it’s been hard to come up for air,” says Ashley Roberts.

Ashley Roberts has confirmed that Pat Roberts, who once played drums with The Mamas & The Papas, took his own life three weeks ago after “a long physical and mental health battle”.

And, in an emotionally-charged Instagram post, the TV presenter has addressed the feelings of “shock and confusion” that so often accompany grief.

Sharing a childhood photo of herself with her father, Roberts wrote: “With great sadness in my heart, I wanted to share with you that on the 19th of March – after a long battle of physical and mental heath – my father took his own life.”

The former Pussycat Dolls star continued: “The past 3.5 weeks I’ve been in a state of shock, confusion, questioning, pain so deep in my guts it’s been hard to come up for air.

“Feeling like I don’t know how to move forward from here. What am I supposed to do with all this? For now, I sit here with this pain – inviting it all in. To teach me, to heal me, to rebuild me.

“If any of you have gone through something similar. I understand and my heart goes out to you.”

Roberts finished by saying that she now hopes to raise awareness of mental health and suicide following her father’s death.

“I will be sharing more on this in the next days, weeks, months to come - as raising awareness here and outreach for those left behind is so so so important,” she said.

“But, for now, I am grateful for your love and support.”

While you can never really generalise how struggling to cope can make you feel or act, the Samaritans have compiled a list of symptoms.


These include:

• Lacking energy or feeling tired

• Feeling restless and agitated

• Feeling tearful

• Not wanting to talk to or be with people

• Not wanting to do things you usually enjoy

• Using alcohol or drugs to cope with feelings

• Finding it hard to cope with everyday things

If you think that these sound like you or someone you know, the charity has urged that you get in touch with them now.   

Samaritans adds: “You don’t have to feel suicidal to get in touch. Only 1 person in 5 who calls Samaritans actually says that they feel suicidal.”

Samaritans (116 123) operates a 24-hour service available every day of the year. If you prefer to write down how you’re feeling, or if you’re worried about being overheard on the phone, you can email Samaritans at jo@samaritans.org

Images: Getty 

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Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

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