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“The freedom that comes is huge”: Cynthia Nixon on embracing the menopause

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Hayley Spencer
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Cynthia Nixon has recently spoken out about the positive effect she’s felt on her career since no longer being fertile – namely that it means she isn’t typecast in mother roles. But that’s not the only benefit she has felt since the changes to her body have taken place.

In an interview with Stella Magazine she’s spoken about how “freeing” it’s been to go through her menopause, and what it’s been like to experience it at the same time as her partner.

Nixon – who has children Samantha, 20, and Charles, 14, with ex-husband Danny Mozes, and Max, 6, with wife Christine Marinoni – said: “There has been no sadness for me, because once you hit 50, you’re done.

“So although I have a [six]-year-old, the freedom that comes from no longer being fertile is huge.”



The star also said that the symptoms that she has experienced while being in perimenopause – when the ovaries gradually begin to produce less oestrogen – for a year have been a huge learning curve.

Cynthia Nixon and Christine Marinoni

Cynthia Nixon and wife Christine Marinoni

“You can have all these crazy mood swings but you can also learn from them: they’re not a mirage,” she said.



“I have hot flashes and a lot of hormonal mood swings, but just like when you get emotional before your period, it doesn’t mean that’s the crazy you,” she joked.

She also revealed that her wife Marinoni, is going through the menopause at the same time.

“What’s hilarious is that my wife and I are going through it at the same time,” she said.

The couple began dating during the final season of Sex and the City in 2004 and married in 2012

Nixon has previously revealed that prior to meeting Marinoni she had never dated a woman before, telling the Radio Times: “So when we started seeing each other, Christine kept waiting for the other shoe to drop, for me to panic about what this would mean – to my career or to myself – as if somehow I just hadn’t noticed that she was a woman.

“And then she met my mother and that was when she stopped worrying about it.”