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Dua Lipa’s message about self-belief deserves to be heard

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Sarah Shaffi
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The singer believes in us.

It’s a universal sign that a performer has had their say and needs to get off the stage when the band strikes up mid-way through their speech.

But at the Grammys on Sunday night, Dua Lipa carried on speaking despite the orchestra’s ever-increasing volume, and we’re so happy she did.

Accepting her award for Best New Artist, Lipa kicked off her speech by referring to the Recording Academy president Neil Portnow’s comments from 2018 that women needed to “step up” if they wanted to be recognised more by the music industry.

61st Annual GRAMMY Awards - Press Room LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - FEBRUARY 10: Dua Lipa attends the 61st Annual GRAMMY Awards - Press Room at Staples Center on February 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jerod Harris/FilmMagic)

Dua Lipa with her Grammy for Best New Artist

Lipa, who also won Best Dance Recording, said she was honoured to be nominated “alongside so many incredible female artists this year, because I guess this year we’ve really stepped up”.

But it was after she thanked her friends and family, and her fans for allowing “me to be the best version of myself” that Lipa made her most poignant remarks.

As the wrap-up music got louder and louder, the singer continued speaking, saying: “For anyone that hasn’t realised how special they are to have a different story, a different background, a name that honours their roots because they just want to be normal, whatever the hell that means, just know that no matter where you’re from, your background or what you believe in, never let that get in the way of you and your dreams because you deserve it. 

“I’m proof that you can do whatever you put your mind to, and however hard you work, I believe in it and I believe in you.”

Although Lipa was then cut off so the Grammys could go to a commercial break, she received a huge round of applause from the audience for her remarks.

Lipa’s message is an important one to anyone who has ever felt insecure about who they are, and we’re so glad she persisted in speaking.

Images: Getty

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Sarah Shaffi

Sarah Shaffi is a freelance journalist and editor. She reads more books a week than is healthy, and balances this out with copious amounts of TV. She writes regularly about popular culture, particularly how it reflects and represents society.

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