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Lena Headey slays internet troll who dared shame her for not wearing make-up

Posted by
Kayleigh Dray
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NEW YORK, NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 11: Lena Headey attends Build Series to discuss 'Fighting with My Family' at Build Studio on February 11, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Dominik Bindl/Getty Images)

Top tip? Never mess with Queen Cersei…

In Game of Thrones, Queen Cersei is famed for her swiftness in delivering retribution. And, judging by her Instagram feed, it seems to be a skill which Lena Headey shares with her character.

Earlier this week, the actress took to the social media site to share a video of herself sat on a plane after a three-day press tour for her new film, Fighting With My Family.

Despite her admitting it had been a long slog, Headey kept her message incredibly upbeat and positive, informing fans that she is incredibly proud of her new movie, and urging them to go and “f**king see it,” when it hits cinemas later this month.

However, one troll decided to take umbrage with the fact that Headey had (shock horror) posted the video before applying any make-up.

“Don’t record yourself without make-up again,” wrote the troll, masquerading under the name of Hodor (another Game of Thrones character).

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Of course, Headey was unimpressed by this unsocilicited advice, and took to Instagram to post a screenshot of the shaming comment.

And then, clearly taking some advice from her GOT alter-ego (after all, “a good king knows when to save his strength and when to destroy his enemies”), she unleashed her wrath.

“I shall continue to not wear make-up,” Headey captioned the picture.

“Go f**k yourself.”

Headey’s fans, naturally, went wild. And it wasn’t long before her female co-stars stepped in to applaud the take-down, either: Emilia Clarke (who plays Daenerys Targaryen) left a comment saying “PREACH BEAUTIFUL WOMAN.” And Gwendoline Christie (who plays Brienne of Tarth) sent along a series of pink hearts. 

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Of course, Headey is not the first woman in the public eye to be shamed for not wearing make-up, and we sadly doubt she will be the last.

A few years back, Alicia Keys came under fire after starting up her #nomakeup revolution.

The singer had penned a powerful essay about why she has chosen to ditch her beauty products in favour of a natural, bare-faced look, explaining that going out without make-up had left her feeling empowered and more like herself.

“I don’t want to cover up anymore,” she admitted. “Not my face, not my mind, not my soul, not my thoughts, not my dreams, not my struggles, not my emotional growth.

“Nothing.”

Many responded positively to the ‘radical’ beauty decision, praising Keys for reminding young girls that “it’s beautiful to be yourself” – and that makeup is optional, depending on people’s own preferences.

However not everyone was pleased with the musician’s personal choices, insisting that she had gone “too far” and that it was time for her to at least wear some light make-up. Several social media users even accused her of lying about her “imaginary” beauty regime.

Keys, like Headey after her, used social media to respond to the negative comments being made about her.

Sharing a photo of herself blowing a kiss, she wrote: “Y’all, me choosing to be make-up free doesn’t mean I’m anti-makeup. Do you!”

Her message was clear; make-up should be optional, and nobody should ever be made to feel like they must or must not wear it.

Her husband Swizz Beatz echoed the sentiment on Instagram.

“Somebody sitting home mad because somebody didn’t wear makeup on their face,” he said. “[But it’s] not your face. You can do whatever you want to do.

“She didn’t tell y’all to wear no makeup. She’s just not vibing with the makeup all the way 100 percent.”

It is worth pointing out that nobody ever mentions the fact that almost every single male celebrity who posts on social media also chooses to go bare-faced.

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Perhaps the #nomakeup revolution will serve as an important reminder about double standards, and open up a wider conversation about the different ways in which men and women are judged by society.

Image: Getty

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Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

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