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What we can learn from Janet Jackson’s Glastonbury power move

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Hannah-Rose Yee
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The singer photoshopped herself right to the top of the promotional poster for the music festival, exactly where she should be. 

It is the year 2019 and Janet Jackson is finally getting her due.

After she was unfairly blamed for the 2004 Super Bowl mishap, Jackson’s career suffered. Her music was banned from the radio, her video clips pulled from circulation. She found herself uninvited from the Grammys and she lost endorsement deals. 

Despite the fact that her third album Control was a multi-million selling record that paved the way for fellow female artists like Beyoncé and Jennifer Lopez, for many years Jackson’s name has been synonymous with the phrase wardrobe malfunction.

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All hail Janet Jackson

But, 15 years later, she’s staging the comeback she always deserved to stage. In 2019, Jackson will be inducted into the Rock & Roll hall of fame and, in June, she will be one of the most eagerly-anticipated performers at Glastonbury.

Jackson celebrated as much when she shared the poster for the musical festival on her social media accounts. But the 52-year-old made a small addition to the image that she shared. Instead of her name appearing fifth on the poster, behind headliners The Killers, The Cure and Stormzy as well as the festival’s ‘Legend’ performer Kylie Minogue, Jackson photoshopped her name to the very top of the image.

Game recognises game, and this is an absolutely inspiring power move from Jackson. We only wish that she had taken the opportunity to photoshop Kylie’s name next to hers as well, as a little bit of women-supporting-women shine theory in action.

Jackson’s crafty photoshopping sent the message that not only does she think that she’s the best, but that she wants everyone else to know, too. And fans could not get enough of it on social media. 

There have been some criticising Jackson for the move, calling her out for “thinking we wouldn’t notice” but, honestly, they’re wrong.

Jackson deserves to be at the top of that poster, and we could all learn something from this serious power move. There’s no imposter syndrome here, just supreme self-confidence and knowledge of her own abilities and power.

Next time you’re feeling like you’re being underappreciated, or that you’re not being recognised for the work you have done, ask yourself ‘What Would Janet Jackson Do’? And then go about metaphorically photoshopping your name to the top of that Glastonbury poster. It’s what you deserve. 

Images: Getty

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Hannah-Rose Yee

Hannah-Rose Yee is a writer, podcaster and recent Australian transplant in London. You can find her on the internet talking about pop culture, food and travel.

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