This is why you’ll never see Jennifer Aniston on social media

Posted by
Moya Crockett

Jennifer Aniston is one of the most well-known women in the world. But unlike the actresses, models and musicians who found fame in the age of social media (hello, Cara Delevingne, Gigi Hadid and Selena Gomez), you won’t see a verified Aniston account popping up on Instagram anytime soon.

The actress, who has no presence on any social media platform, recently sat down for an interview with US Vogue in which she explained the story behind her tech aversion.

“We have so many screens: TVs, computers, phones... I worry we’re filling the days up with too much and it’s hard to focus on ourselves,” Aniston said.

She added that she stays off social media for the sake of her “sanity”.

“Honestly, when I look around and see people constantly on their phones, I feel like we’re missing so much. And it’s something we created. I equate it to the tobacco industry.”


Jennifer Aniston with husband Justin Theroux in July 2017.

Aniston continued: “It’s hard enough being a kid growing up and becoming who you are and finding yourself but now you have social media and you’ve added this extra pressure of seeing if someone likes or doesn’t like something you did.

“We’re creating these man-made challenges and it’s such a drag.”

Rather than spend time online, Aniston – who is set to star in a new TV series about a Manhattan morning news show, alongside her long-time friend Reese Witherspoon – prefers to spend time with friends in real life.

“Sundays, if it’s warm, we’ll go down by the pool and the kids will come over and everybody plays and we make lunch and we roll into an early Sunday supper,” she said, describing her ideal weekend. “We relax and hike and usually there is a workout class that happens.”

Watch: This is how Facebook can lead to depression

How Facebook can lead to depression

Is Facebook getting you down?

Posted by Stylist on Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Aniston also addressed the essay she wrote last year in which she condemned the tabloid industry for criticising famous women’s lives and bodies. While that op-ed went viral and was much praised, Aniston said that she doesn’t think much has changed in how celebrity media treats the women it covers.  

“They’re either fat-shaming, or body-shaming, or childless-shaming,” she said. “It’s a weird obsession that people have and I don’t understand exactly why they need to take people who are out there to entertain you, and rip them apart and bully them? Why are we teaching young women this? It’s incredibly damaging.”

Ultimately, however, she said that she no longer gets upset if a tabloid writes something negative about her.

“In my own brain, I’ve shifted my perspective, so who gives a s***! If you’re going to walk out and have your nipples showing, or your belly is a little bloated, or you’re not at the weight you want to be – you are perfect no matter what you are and no matter where you are and who cares!”

Images: Rex Features


Share this article


Moya Crockett

Moya is Women's Editor at, where she is currently overseeing the Visible Women campaign. Carrying a tiny bottle of hot sauce on her person at all times is one of the many traits she shares with both Beyoncé and Hillary Clinton.

Related Posts