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Jessie J on the heart-breaking moment she learned she couldn’t “ever have children”

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Susan Devaney
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Jessie J stepped on stage and opened up about her fertility issues during her Royal Albert Hall show.

It would be easy to assume that Jessie J has it all, simply because she graces our TV screens via The Voice and has a string of musical hits to her name.

However, on Tuesday 13 November at London’s Royal Albert Hall, she took to the stage and revealed to her fans that she won’t ever be able to have children.

Shortly before her performance of Four Letter Word, one of the lead singles from her new album R.O.S.E, the musician told the crowd: “I was told four years ago that I can’t ever have children.

“I don’t tell you guys for sympathy because I’m one of millions of women and men that have gone through this and will go through this,” she continued

However, the singer stressed that she doesn’t want or expect sympathy: instead, she wants to help others who are going through fertility struggles to realise that they are not alone.

“It can’t be something that defines us but I wanted to write this song for myself in my moment of pain and sadness but also to give myself joy, to give other people something that they can listen to in that moment when it gets really hard,” she said.

“So if you’ve ever experienced anything with this or have seen somebody else go through it or have lost a child, then please know you’re not alone in your pain and I’m thinking of you when I sing this song.”

Earlier this year, actress and writer Lena Dunham revealed she’d undergone a hysterectomy at the age of 31. 

Dunham was admitted to hospital three times before making the decision to have the operation. And it was not a choice she made lightly: indeed, in a powerful open essay, the actress detailed the chronic pain she had endured as a result of her endometriosis, not to mention the “years of complex surgeries measuring in the double digits” she had been through.

The Girls star goes on to explain that her uterus caused her so many issues that her friend had named it Judy.

“My body is mostly healed and every day I find a new bruise on my heart, but today I offer myself gratitude: from the most pained place, I somehow knew to choose myself. The purest glint of who we are and know we can be is always available to us, calm and true at our centre,” Dunham wrote.

“My friend Paul named my uterus Judy, and when she was being uppity we called her out, hence the tattoo on my ribs, which hurt like f**k even through the pain meds: #RIPJudy. Today I give thanks for Judy, for her graceful exit and for this body, which is stronger than I’ve ever given it credit for.”

Take note: let’s all be more thankful for our bodies.

Images: Getty / Instagram 

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Susan Devaney

Susan Devaney is a digital journalist for Stylist.co.uk, writing about fashion, beauty, travel, feminism, and everything else in-between.

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