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“It’s something I struggle with every day”: Jodie Foster opens up about her fear of failure

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Harriet Hall
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Dual Oscar-winner, Jodie Foster, has opened up about her fear of failure. The actor and director has admitted that juggling between that, and a celebrity ego is something she ‘struggles with every day.’

The Silence of the Lambs star made the comments in an interview with Stuff, while describing the character George Clooney plays in her latest directorial work, Money Monster.

“So much about being a celebrity is this strange combination of having to have a big ego and having that ego be continually supported and also feeling like nobody knows who you really are and the person that you really are is really a failure. You're always juggling those two things,” she says.

“It’s something that I struggle with every day,” she continues. “Well, I don’t know if we all do but I certainly do.”

Money Monster, starring Clooney, Julia Roberts and Jack O’Connell, tells the story of a hostage situation in a live TV studio, against the backdrop of the aftershocks of the financial crisis.

taxi driver

Jodie Foster in Taxi Driver, 1976

The director describes the film as a look at failure, saying: “I see myself in every one of these characters, including the men and the women.”

The 53-year-old shot to fame following her controversial role alongside Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver 40 years ago, and has since starred in several award-winning films, and won two Oscars and three Golden Globes - but admits that the continual fear of failure has stayed with her, telling ABC that:

“I guess you’re worried that you’re never going to be as good.

“You know that it was just a lucky thing and that you'll never find material that was that good and that touching.”

Foster also went on to tell the Australian news station her thoughts on today’s hot button topic, Hollywood sexism, saying that although she can see “enormous strides have been made for women in the industry,” there is still a long way to go:

“Women directors – it’s still an area that’s changed very little. I don’t know why there wasn’t more discussion over the last 50 years, but there is now, so that bodes well for the future.”

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Harriet Hall

Harriet Hall is a former Stylist contributor.

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