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“I don't feel cool” Lena Dunham talks turning 30 and long-distance love

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Amy Swales
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With a hit TV show under her belt, plus films, a book and her new feminist e-newsletter, it's easy to forget Lena Dunham has packed in all these achievements before she even turns 30.

And in a new interview for the November issue of Harper's Bazaar, in which she looks amazing posing nearly naked for the accompanying shoot, the star says she's excited about leaving her 20s behind.

“I am so excited about turning 30. I'm psyched about it because I think that being in your 20s — especially as a woman — there's an inherent tension. Ageism exists in all directions, but it isn't the sweet spot for being taken seriously in the workplace. I've been really lucky. I got to do a lot of things before I was 30 that most people don't.”

She added: “There's so much torture that comes with being young, female, and trying to figure it out. I mean, I made a whole TV show about it.”

Dunham and musician fiancé Jack Antonoff have been together for nearly four years, and in the interview, the Girls creator discusses what it's like maintaining a relationship when both parties are so busy.

She told the magazine: “Whenever people ask, ‘What's the secret to a long-distance relationship?’ I'm like, ‘It's hard.’ That's why it's really important that we share a home because you see the person's stuff, and you're like, ‘Okay, you're coming back here’.”

girls

Lena Dunham with her Girls co-stars

 

While many of her fans may see Dunham as the very epitome of cool, the lady herself insists it's not something she considers herself to be.

“Cool is when you do whatever the f**k you want. I don't feel cool now [...] If I do feel cool, I see a picture of myself later and I'm like, 'That was a disaster.' What I do feel is a freedom from certain kinds of pressures. Now I don't give a s**t if you know that my jacket is from Ann Taylor.”

As an active social media user, Dunham is no stranger to online abuse and has previously spoken to Stylist about feeling targeted by some websites in particular. Now she says the more hurtful criticism has taught her “true pain”. 

“I've been put to bed for weeks from reading things about myself on sites that used to be considered feminist gospel,” she told Harper's. “[But] I love the Internet because every piece of true pain I've experienced as an adult—with the exception of death in the family and breakups—has come from it.”

Read the full interview and see the shoot in November's issue of Harper's Bazaar.

Images: Instagram/harpersbazaarus, Rex Features

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Amy Swales

Amy Swales is a freelance writer who likes to eat, drink and talk about her dog. She will continue to plunder her own life and the lives of her loved ones for material in the name of comedy, catharsis and getting pictures of her dog on the internet.

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