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“The LGBTQ community feels like home”: Matilda star comes out after Orlando shootings

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Moya Crockett
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After the devastating attack on a gay club in Orlando, Florida on Sunday, the actress Mara Wilson has spoken out about her own sexuality on social media.

The former child star, 28, who played Matilda in the iconic 1996 movie of the same name, shared a photo on Twitter that showed her first visit to a gay club, aged 18.

“Being a ‘straight girl’ where I clearly didn’t belong, but I will say, I felt so welcomed there,” she wrote. “I have never had a better experience at a club than I did then… I haven’t been to one [a gay club] since college, except once when a friend brought me along. I didn’t feel like I belonged there.

“But the LGBTQ community has always felt like home, especially a few years later when I, uh, learned something about myself,” she continued. “So thank you.”

Wilson's comments prompted several Twitter users to ask her if she was referring to her sexuality, to which she replied that she defined herself as a '2' on the Kinsey scale. Otherwise known as the Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale, the Kinsey scale ranges from 0 (exclusively heterosexual) to 6 (exclusively homosexual). 

She added: “I used to identify as mostly straight. I’ve embraced the Bi/Queer label lately.”

Wilson’s tweets led some Twitter users to accuse her of “attention-seeking” in the wake of the tragedy in Orlando. She responded that she had been responding to a question from a follower, and that she was uninterested in responding to requests for interviews about her sexuality. 

But as one sage Twitter user pointed out, if we start restricting when people can talk about their sexuality to “only when nothing bad has happened”, nobody would ever be able to come out again.

Amen to that. Brava, Mara.

Image: Rex Features

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Moya Crockett

Moya is Women’s Editor at stylist.co.uk, where she is currently overseeing the Visible Women campaign. As well as writing about inspiring women and feminism, she also covers subjects including careers, podcasts and politics. Carrying a tiny bottle of hot sauce on her person at all times is one of the many traits she shares with both Beyoncé and Hillary Clinton.

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