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Pink explains why she isn’t raising her children as gender-neutral

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Kayleigh Dray
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NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 06: Pink seen leaving a hotel on April 6, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Gotham/GC Images)

Pink has opened up about the recent reports that she has chosen to raise her children as gender neutral – and explained why they’re not necessarily true.

From Just Like A Pill and Sober, to F**kin’ Perfect and So What, there’s no denying that we’ve all raised a glass to Pink’s powerhouse vocals at some point in our lives.

More importantly, though, we’ve long admired how she’s made it her business to defy societal norms, gender stereotypes and beauty expectations. So, when reports claimed that she was raising her children as gender neutral, many took them as gospel: it just seemed to fit with everything we knew about Pink.

Now, though, the singer has explained that she prefers to raise six-year-old Willow Sage and one-year-old Jameson Moon in a “label-less” environment.

“I feel like gender-neutral is in itself a label and I’m label-less,” she told People.

“I don’t like labels at all, so I believe that a woman and a girl can do anything.”

More than anything, Pink says she believes in “fairness and justice. And I believe that a boy can do anything. So I have boys that flip dirt bikes and I have boy friends that wear dresses. It’s all OK to me. It’s whatever floats your boat.

“So that’s the kind of house that we live in.”

Pink added that she has embraced an attachment parenting style when it comes to her children.

“I believe in affection,” she said firmly. “I believe in needs being met and faith being implemented, and I believe in letting your kids know they can count on you, and that you’ll be there. [But] my parents obviously did not believe in that and I worked out OK.

“I always tell Willow, ‘I’m going to teach you the rules so that you’ll know how and when to break them.’”

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Despite the fact that the world is pretty much made up of Pink fans (she really is that popular!), there are still a good few people out there who might be surprised to learn that ‘Pink’ isn’t actually the singer’s real name. Rather, it’s a stage name – and one which she has been using since she was around 14 years old.

However, the singer – real name Alecia Beth Moore – has said that her chosen moniker has followed her around for even longer than that.

Back in 2010, she explained: “The first time [I was called Pink] was actually not very nice. This kid I had a crush on, Devin – I went to the YMCA as a summer camp because it was the cheapest one and this kid pulled my pants down in front of everybody at this auditorium because we had gone swimming.

“I swam in my underwear because I didn’t have a bathing suit and then I was just like, ‘Oh there’s only one thing left in the day; I just won’t put my underwear back on.’ And then he pulled my pants down in front of everybody and I totally blushed and my butt cheeks were pink.

“He was like, ‘Yeah, pink!’ and everyone made fun of me. I ran home crying and I lived it down. That was like, when I was eight.”

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However, it was Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs that solidified the name for her – and helped her reclaim it in her own empowering way.

“When the Reservoir Dogs movie came out, Mr. Pink is like, the smart, sassy, smartass kind of guy with the attitude,” she said.

“And me and all my friends were sitting around and we all kind of just dubbed each other. And they picked me for Mr. Pink.”

It’s safe to say that the name has now become synonymous with incredible music, mind-boggling stage acrobatics and the championing of women’s rights. All hail Pink!

Image: Getty

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Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

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