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Which mum is yours? We take a look at the most famous on-screen mother moments

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As we prepare to raise a toast to our mums this Sunday, we take a look at the most memorable mother moments on film - and what you can learn from them...

The pushy mum: Mrs Bennet 

Mrs Bennet

(Pride and Prejudice TV mini-series, 1995)

Mrs Bennet is the archetypal pushy mum whose five daughters bear the brunt of her consuming obsession to see them down the aisle in the arm of "a single man of good fortune".

Needless to say, she is not impressed when Lizzie turns down a proposal from the oily Mr Collins and marks her feelings with much flapping of handkerchiefs, wailing, and sniffing of vapours.

In the manner of all daughters with difficult mothers, Lizzie rises above the melodrama in a decision that pays dividends - as she eventually says "I Do" to the richer, and vastly more good-looking Mr Darcy.

The moral of the moment: Don't give into your pushy mum.

The thinks-she-knows-best mum: Bridget Jones' mother

Bridget Jones

(Bridget Jones' Diary, 2001)

Like Mrs Bennet, all Bridget Jones' mum really wants is to see her daughter settle down with some nice young man. 

And she's determined this will happen, if only Bridget will ditch her "dreary" wardrobe for patterned florals of a Laura Ashley ilk.

One of the funniest moments of the film comes when she insists Bridget change into some garish lampshade-style attire at a post-Christmas turkey buffet at Aunty Una's. 

She's well-meaning but hopelessly OTT and full of outrageous one-liners that only a mum like her could utter. Unsurprisingly, dressed in her curtain-print waistcoat, Bridget fails to conjure up even a flicker of interest in Mark Darcy (himself dressed in a comedy Christmas top). 

The moral of the moment: Don't trust your mum when it comes to clothes.

The wise mum: Marmee

Marmee

(Little Women, 1994)

"Time erodes all such beauty, but what it cannot diminish is the wonderful workings of your mind: Your humor, your kindness, and your moral courage"

Marmee is the guiding light and moral compass for her five spirited daughters. No matter how tight money is with their father away, no matter how many petty squabbles they have, or larger life troubles they face, Marmee is always there with a quiet but firm word of sage advice.

We see this early on in the book/film when Marmee asks the girls to give away their decadent Christmas morning breakfast to poor neighbours in need. Some of them are reluctant to do so, but they do it anyway and learn that - as always - their mother is right.

The moral of the moment: If your mum is wise like Marmee, listen to her. 

The big-hearted mum: Peg Boggs

Edward Scissorhands

(Edward Scissorhands, 1990)

Who wouldn't want a mum like Peg Boggs?

This Avon lady has a heart of gold and could never just leave Edward Scissorhands, all scarred, lonely and abandoned up in his castle.

Her best mum moment comes when, using maternal instinct and her own gentle brand of charm, she coaxes him back to the family home where she cares for him as if he were her own (and persuades her kids and husband to do the same).

Loving and sweet-natured to a fault, this is a mum in a million. 

The moral of the moment: Cherish your caring mum, just as she cherishes you. 

The unconventional mum: Morticia Addams 

Addams family

(Addams Family Values, 1993)

Ah, Morticia Addams. How we love her. 

This rather laissez faire mode of mum doesn't care if her kids are lobbing the youngest one off the roof, or threatening to execute him with a homemade guillotine.

She will however, draw the line, when her baby sprouts blonde curls and develops a penchant for Cat In A Hat ("Oh dear. He lives."). 

One of our best Morticia mum moments comes when she bemoans the fact that she's overwhelmed by having three children; not because she wants a kip, or a large glass of wine - but because she just can't spend enough time as she'd like with the dark forces.

The moral of the moment: If your mum's as crazy as Morticia, enjoy it - you'll get away with murder (quite literally). 

The hippie mum: Fiona Brewer 

Fiona Brewer

(About a Boy, 2002)

Yes she's suicidal and completely naive about the realities of her son's everyday life.

But Fiona Brewer, aka the mum in About A Boy, loves her son Marcus fiercely and instills him with key values of respect and warmth for humanity. 

Her hippie credentials - the headscarves and New Age beliefs - could be deeply embarrassing for a teenage boy. But instead Marcus embraces them, even risking social suicide when he decides to sing an off-key version of Killing Me Softly in his school battle of the bands, as he knows it's her favourite song.

This prompts one of her best mum moments, when she offers to take him for a Big Mac - which basically represents everything she considers morally wrong - in order to make him happy. 

The moral of the moment: You might be embarrassed of your hippie mum, but you will come to treasure her uniqueness when you're grown-up. 

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