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Watch: Can you fall in love with a stranger?

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Emily Baker
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Scientists say that asking these questions followed by a four minute stare-off can cause you to fall in love, so obviously we had to give it a go

Have you ever been sat across the table on a first date, desperately racking your brains for something interesting to say? It’s horrendous - especially, when you actually like the person you’re attempting to chat to and are keen to impress them. But luckily for you, the Stylist team have tried and tested a dating method scientists are sure will make a stranger fall in love with you and vice versa.

According to a study, if you ask a certain set of questions and you find you like the answers your date provides, you’ll know them well enough to fall in love. Some are quite standard getting-to-know-you fare, like “given the choice of anyone in the world, who would you want as a dinner guest?”

But others are a little deeper, as you’re expected to delve into your date’s mind. By the end of the questioning, you’ll know what they’re most grateful for, and what they would say is their most positive characteristic. Maybe it’s a good idea to casually slot these questions into natural conversation, to avoid a less-than-romantic police interrogation atmosphere…

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To make things even more awkward, we then had our six strangers take part in a four-minute silent stare-off.

So did it work? Well, kind of. While no-one admitted they fell in love, two of our couples said there was a spark of attraction between them and would most likely see each other again. Our own experiment might not have matched up to the scientific standards of the original, but we’re taking these results as a success. 

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Emily Baker

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