People

Brand new Wimbledon champion Angelique Kerber told us what she thinks the meaning of life is

Posted by
Moya Lothian-McLean
Published
Wimbledon 2018 champion Angelique Kerber wears adidas x Palace whilst sat in a garden.

What will the Wimbledon champion, 30, make of our existential questions? 

What is the meaning of life?

Being happy. This comes from enjoying the moment, trying to improve yourself, learning about yourself and realising if you just have one life you have to do your best with it and be happy with what you do.

What is the difference between right and wrong?

It is not as easy as a definitive right and wrong because you are often faced with difficult decisions. You have to look at a decision and work out what feels right for you and others around you.

Where is your happy place?

Home, which right now is in Poland [Angelique is originally from Germany]. There is nothing like being with your friends and family where you can totally relax after tough weeks.

Nature or nurture?

Both. You have to open yourself up to all aspects to achieve great things.

Is it more important to be liked or respected?

I respect everybody; for me respect is the most important thing. I would like to think if you respect everyone, then they respect you in turn.

If you could be remembered for one thing what would it be?

That if you work hard and believe in yourself you can achieve anything.

Who or what is your greatest love?

Tennis. I started playing it with my parents, who were also tennis players, when I was three years old. I have spent my whole life on court, enjoying the sport, playing big tournaments… there isn’t an aspect of the sport I don’t love.

When did you last lie?

I try my best to be honest, but I lied this morning when I said I would be on time for this interview! We went out last night to celebrate the win and said I would be ready in five minutes when really, I knew it would take 10 minutes… at least.

Does the supernatural exist?

I believe there must be something supernatural out there, but I think everyone should be allowed their own beliefs.

Are you fatalistic?

Definitely. I think a lot of life is down to fate. When I started in tennis, I dreamed of being a Wimbledon champion. So many things had to come together for it to happen that fate had to play a part.

What is your greatest fear?

Needles – which is not great when you have to be dope-tested every four weeks.

Animals or babies?

Can I have both? I love my dog, but I also love babies.

What talent do you yearn for?

To be able to sing and cook; never accept an invite to a dinner party at my house.

Do you like to be complimented?

I think everyone does. If someone says they can trust me, that is the biggest compliment.

Do you have a high pain threshold?

I have a super-high pain threshold. In all sports you have to push yourself to the absolute limit, even when you don’t think you can push yourself any further. I am used to reaching high levels of pain.

What book do you recommend most to others?

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

Picture of the front cover of Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist.

The three-times grand slam winner has a soft spot for The Alchemist.

Which lesson has been the hardest to learn?

That when you fall, standing up and coming back is not easy. In fact, it is the hardest thing to do because you have to believe in yourself.

What food sums up happiness?

Stracciatella ice cream.

What have you never understood? 

How people can go without having three meals a day.

What is the one thing you want to know before you die?

Howto keep a moment alive forever and make sure it never fades away.

Are you scared of dying or what happens when you die? 

No, I am not scared. It is an inevitability of life.

Quinoa or Quavers?

Quinoa.

Angelique Kerber wears the adidas Tennis x Palace collection 

Images: adidas 

Topics

Share this article

Author

Moya Lothian-McLean

Moya Lothian-McLean is Stylist’s editorial assistant where she spends her time inventing ways to shoehorn Robbie Williams into pieces. A reoffending dancefloor menace, a weekend finds her taking up too much space at disco nights around the city and subsequently recovering with dark sunglasses and late brunch the next day. 

Other people read

More from People

More from Moya Lothian-McLean