Artist photographs the oldest living things in the world

In an age of disposable fashion and quick news on the internet, this is a world where time is measured in millennia.

Since 2004, Brooklyn-based contemporary artist Rachel Sussman has researched, collaborated with biologists, and braved some of the world’s harshest climates from Antarctica to the Mojave Desert in order to photograph the oldest continuously living organisms on Earth.

This includes plants like Pando, the “Trembling Giant,” a colony of trees in Utah with a massive underground root system estimated to be 80,000 years old. Or the dense Llareta, a plant that produces tiny flowers in Chile and has been around for over 3,000 years.

For the first time, her photographs have been gathered together in a new book titled The Oldest Living Things in the World which contains 125 photographs.

Check out a few of her most remarkable snaps below.

La Llareta, up to 3,000 years old, Atacama Desert, Chile

Antarctic Moss, 5,500 years old, Elephant Island, Antarctica

Segole Boabab, 2,000 years old, Limpopo Province, South Africa

Stromatolites, 2,000 - 3,000 years old, Cable Station, Western Australia

Spruce Gran Picea, 9,550 years old, Fulufjället, Sweden

Pando tree, 80,000 years, Fish Lake , Utah

Jōmon Sugi, 2,180 - 7,000 years old, Yakushima, Japan

(Images: Rachel Sussman)

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