Travel

These are the 10 best countries to be a woman around Europe

Posted by
Kayleigh Dray
Published
Woman standing next to a wall of graffiti

If you’re planning on relocating any time soon, look this way…

We already know that the ‘wanderlust gene’ is real, and that some 20% of the population is affected by this inherent desire – nay, need – to travel.

If you’re one of them, though, and you’ve got a hankering to spread your wings and start a new career overseas, there’s a lot to consider first. From taxes, to wages, to the work-life balance on offer, you need to do a lot of research before picking out your new home.

And pretty high on that list might be your destination’s attitude to gender equality. Fortunately for you, though, the top countries in the world for this particular attribute have just been named – and Europe, as a continent, came out on top.

You may also like

These are the 10 safest countries to live in as a woman, and the UK's not one of them

Now, a new study has taken the study further. They have examined every European country in depth, and analysed them according to 12 measurable factors, including pay gap, tampon tax rates, access to contraception, employment rate, percentage of women in government, female life expectancy, and more.

Overall, the results put Germany at the top of the list, thanks to its high volume of female billionaires, percentage of young women in secondary education, high female life expectancy and excellent paternal leave allowance. Germany was followed closely by Norway, France and Iceland.

However, it is worth noting that Portugal, France and Belgium boasted the highest contraception scores – and the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom ruled supreme when it came to countries with the lowest tampon tax.

The top 10 European countries for women

  1. Germany
  2. Norway
  3. France
  4. Iceland
  5. Sweden
  6. Finland
  7. Republic of Ireland
  8. United Kingdom
  9. Netherlands
  10. Slovenia

“While much of the continent, especially the Scandinavian countries, have been working towards gender equality for a long while, some have only made big steps in recent years,” explained researchers, noting that women in Portugal only won equal voting rights in 1976 and abortion was only made legal in the Republic of Ireland last year.

It is worth noting that Portugal, France and Belgium boasted the highest contraception scores. And, in terms of having the lowest tampon tax, it was our very own Republic of Ireland and United Kingdom.

Check it out:

The 5 Countries With The Highest Tampon Tax:

  • Hungary - 27%
  • Norway - 25%
  • Sweden - 25%
  • Denmark - 25%
  • Croatia - 25%

The 5 Countries With The Lowest Tampon Tax:

  • Republic of Ireland - 0%
  • United Kingdom - 5 %
  • France - 5.5%
  • Netherlands - 6%
  • Belgium - 6%

You may also like

Your tampon tax is going to fund an anti-abortion charity

Still not sure which European country is best for you and your needs? You can check out the data in full here.

Happy travels!

Image: Mikail Duran/Unsplash     

Topics

Share this article

Author

Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

Recommended by Kayleigh Dray

Life

Another UK supermarket has agreed to pay the tampon tax for customers

Following on from Tesco’s recent announcement

Posted by
Moya Crockett
Published
Ask A Feminist

'Who has the right to talk about feminism?'

This week's Ask A Feminist dilemma

Posted by
Stylist Team
Published
Travel

These are Europe’s five best countries ranked by quality of living

And what makes them so special...

Posted by
Amy Lewis
Published
Travel

These are the 10 best countries to relocate to, according to expats

Thinking of a big move? These are the countries you should consider

Posted by
Moya Lothian-McLean
Published
Life

These are the 10 safest countries to live in as a woman

And the UK isn't one of them

Posted by
Megan Murray
Published