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Queen of the curve: Zaha Hadid's 10 most stunning architectural designs

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Sarah Biddlecombe
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Iraqi-born British architect, Dame Zaha Hadid died, aged 65, yesterday.

The first woman - and Muslim - to receive a prestigious Pritzker Architect Prize in 2004, and the first woman to be awarded a Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) gold medal in 2015, Hadid's buildings were commissioned in countries around the world, including Hong Kong, Germany and Azerbaijan. She also designed one of the stadiums that will take centre stage at the Qatar World Cup in 2022.

As well as her incredible design work, Hadid will also be remembered as a feminist trailblazer. Speaking on the challenge of making it as a female in a male-dominated industry, she told The Financial Times in 2013, "As a woman in architecture you’re always an outsider. It’s OK, I like being on the edge."

The architect always spoke her mind, and famously hung up on an interview with Radio 4 last year. 

From the London Aquatics Centre, designed for the 2012 Olympics, to the striking, 842 metre long Sheikh Zayed Bridge, here we have selected 10 of her most stunning designs.

  • Guangzhou Opera House, Guangzhou City, south China

    Hadid described the Guangzhou Opera House, designed in 2010, as being "like pebbles in a stream smoothed by erosion".

  • Interior view of the Guangzhou Opera House, Guangzhou City, south China

    The luxurious design cost £130 million to build.

  • Lingkong Soho, Shanghai, China

    Measuring 350,000 square metres, this curved building was completed in 2014.

  • Lingkong Soho, Shanghai, China

    It houses a mix of offices and retail companies.

  • London Aquatics Centre

    The London Aquatics centre was built for the 2012 Olympic Games and houses two 50 metre long swimming pools as well as seats for up to 2,500 spectators. It cost £269 million to build.

  • London Aquatics Centre

    Incredibly, the giant waved roof is supported by just three concrete pillars.

  • Serpentine Sackler Gallery and The Magazine cafeteria, London

    Opened to the public in November 2013, the cafeteria is located on one side of the 200-year-old Serpentine Gallery.

  • Serpentine Sackler Gallery and The Magazine cafeteria, London

    The building boasts huge windows that let light flood into the restaurant.

  • Dongdaemun Design Plaza, Seoul, Korea

    Completed in 2014, this 38,000 square metre complex is covered in 45,000 shimmering aluminium panels.

  • Dongdaemun Design Plaza, Seoul, Korea

    The compex provides an art hub comprising design and technology companies as well as a landscaped park.

  • Jockey Club Innovation Tower, Hong Kong, China

    Completed in 2014, this tower is home to the Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

  • Jockey Club Innovation Tower, Hong Kong, China

    The tower is made up of no fewer than 15 levels.

  • Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center, Baku, Azerbaijan

    This curved, 619,000 square foot building was awarded the London Design Museum award in 2014.

  • Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center, Baku, Azerbaijan

    It cost £174 million to build.

  • Eli and Edythe Broad Museum, East Lansing, United States

    Completed in 2012, this 46,000 square metre building is housed on the Michigan State University campus.

  • Eli and Edythe Broad Museum, East Lansing, United States

    The museum serves as a cultural hub for both the University and surrounding community.

  • Sheikh Zayed Bridge, Abu Dhabi

    Designed in 2010, and named after the country's principal architect, the Sheikh Zayed Bridge is 842 metres long.

  • Sheikh Zayed Bridge, Abu Dhabi

    The bridge cost £200 million to build.

  • Galaxy Soho, Beijing, China

    This 18 storey building houses retail, office and entertainment companies. It was completed in 2012.

  • Galaxy Soho, Beijing, China

    Each company is housed in one of four huge domes connected by bridges.

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Sarah Biddlecombe

Sarah Biddlecombe is an award-winning journalist and Digital Features Editor at Stylist

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