Visible Women

From Louis C.K’s protesters to Zoë Kravitz: the women making waves this week

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Hannah-Rose Yee
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Dropping every Friday, Women Making Waves is a series highlighting the women who rocked the boat, pushed for change and made history around the world this week.  

Two women protest Louis C.K’s comeback comedy tour

Despite being accused by five women of sexual misconduct last year stand-up comedian Louis C.K is currently performing on the stand -up circuit at New York’s Comedy Cellar. The comedian, who was described as “very relaxed”, received a standing ovation for his sold-out set. But there were at least two people in attendance who were not as impressed.

Jennifer Boudinot and Lana McCrea appeared at the comedy club to protest his appearance with signs that read “Does this sign make you uncomfortable, Louie?” and “When you support Louis C.K., you tell women your laughter is more important than their sexual assaults and loss of their careers.” 

Speaking to the New York Times, Boudinot said that she was “furious” when she heard he would be appearing at the Comedy Cellar. “Every female comedian he has harmed deserves a place on the Comedy Cellar stage one hundred times before he should be allowed back on the stage.” 

Female referees take centre stage at the Premiership Rugby Cup

If you happen to catch the Premiership Rugby Cup’s clash between Wasps RFC and the Northampton Saints at Ricoh Arena this weekend, you’ll be part of history. It’s there that Sara Cox will become the first female referee to call a Premiership Rugby Cup game.

This isn’t Cox’s first time in the history books. She’s also the first contracted female referee at the Rugby Football Union and also the first woman to referee a game in the Greene King IPA Championship, an accolade she earned in March.

Zoë Kravitz calls out the director who sexually harassed her 

Zoë Kravitz

In a new interview, Zoë Kravitz has spoken for the first time about a director who sexually harassed her when she was a teenager.

Speaking to Rolling Stone, Kravitz said that “I definitely worked with a director who made me very uncomfortable. I was young – maybe 19 or 20 – and we were on location, staying at the same hotel. And it was full-on: ‘Can I come inside your room?’ Just totally inappropriate… And then he’d do things like come to the makeup trailer and touch my hair. Or say, ‘Let me see your costume – turn around?’ It’s just never OK for someone to do that. Especially when they’re in a position of power.”

Kravitz also revealed in the interview that she pushed for a more explicit acknowledgement of her race on the first season of Big Little Lies. “I wish they’d had Reese’s character say ‘His hot black wife’,” she said. “That’s real! But people are scared to go there. If we’re making art and trying to dissect the human condition, let’s really do that.” 

Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer gets ready to step into Angela Merkel’s shoes 

Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer and Angela Merkel

Angela Merkel, the longterm German Chancellor of the past 13 years, is preparing to step down. Which means that in 2021 the most important political position in Germany will be up for grabs, and it’s possible that it might be Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer who steps into her shoes, according to the Guardian.

Kramp-Karrenbauer, 56, is the current Secretary-General of the Christian Democrats Party – the second most powerful role in the party – of which Merkel is the chair. Known as the “mini-Merkel”, she’s hotly tipped to take over from her mentor.

She’s an unabashed feminist whose husband is a stay-at-home dad who sacrificed his career as an engineer in order for his wife to succeed. “The difficulties of combining a job and a family were what led me to become politically active in the first place,” she has said. 

Japanese Princess Ayako leaves the palace for love 

Kei Moriya and Princess Ayako at their wedding

Japan’s Princesses have the most unfair deal of all: If they want to marry someone who isn’t aristocratic they must relinquish their royal titles. This rule, we might add, does not apply for their brothers the Princes. It’s only the women who must choose between love and family.

This week, Japanese Princess Ayako chose love, marrying her partner Kei Moriya at Tokyo’s Meiji Shrine in a silent protest against the outdated Japanese Imperial regulations on 29 October, reports CNN. Ayako, 28, is the youngest daughter of Prince Takamado and Princess Hisako, and will lose her title and her royal allowance after wedding her partner. In images taken just after the ceremony, the couple beamed at well-wishers and gave a few statements to the crowd about their blissful union.

“I am awed by how blessed I am,” Ayako said at her marriage ceremony. “I will leave the imperial family today, but will remain unchanged in my support for his majesty and her majesty.” 

Women Making Waves is part of Stylist’s Visible Women campaign to raise awareness of women who’ve made a difference to society. See more Visible Women stories here.  

Images: Getty

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