Visible Women

Women’s Daily Dispatch: The news you need to know on 12/1/18

Posted by
Susan Devaney
Published

As part of our Visible Women initiative, Stylist.co.uk brings you the Women’s Daily Dispatch: your new daily digest of international news relating to women. It’s the good, bad, inspiring and urgent stories you need to know from around the world, all wrapped up in one bitesize piece. 

In today’s WWD, we take a look at Mira Scorvino’s emotional apology letter to Dylan Farrow after working with Woody Allen; Olivia Munn’s shaming of Mark Wahlberg after the sexist pay disparity with co-star Michelle Williams in All the Money in the World; why a Pakistani newsreader brought her daughter on air to protest a young girl’s rape and murder; and how women in Saudi Arabia are making history by entering football stadiums for the first time. 

Mira Scorvino pens emotional apology letter for working with Woody Allen

Actress Mira Sorvino has penned an emotional open letter to Dylan Farrow, saying she’s “terribly sorry” for having previously worked with the Hollywood director Woody Allen.

Sorvino, who picked up an Oscar for her portrayal of a prostitute in Allen’s 1995 comedy Mighty Aphrodite, joins an increasing list of actresses who’ve expressed regret – including Greta Gerwig and Ellen Page - for having worked with the award-winning writer and director and has vowed to “never work with him again”.

“I cannot begin to imagine how you have felt, all these years as you watched someone you called out as having hurt you as a child, a vulnerable little girl in his care, be lauded again and again, including by me and countless others in Hollywood who praised him and ignored you,” Sorvino wrote for the HuffPost.

“As a mother and a woman, this breaks my heart for you. I am so, so sorry!”

You can read our full story here

Olivia Munn’s shames Mark Wahlberg for the sexist pay disparity with co-star Michelle Williams in All the Money in the World 

Whilst hosting the 2018 Critics’ Choice Awards, Olivia Munn made a point of blasting Mark Wahlberg for receiving $1.5 million (£1.1 million) on the reshoots for All the Money in the World while co-star Michelle Williams made the SAG minimum of $80 (£59) a day.

Munn joined comedian and actress Niecy Nash for a segment in which the two thanked men for not being terrible.

“At this time, my friend Niecy Nash and I would like to make a toast to all the good guys in Hollywood,” Munn began.

The pair went on to reference the Golden Globes and Harvey Weinstein before turning their attention to Mark Wahlberg.

“I do want to say thank you to the producers for paying Niecy and I the same amount of money and Mark Wahlberg $1 million,” Munn said.

“He took a pay cut, so that’s really nice and generous of him. Thank you so much.”

You can read our full story here

Pakistani Newsreader brings her daughter on air to protest a young girl’s rape and murder

Kiran Naz with her young daughter live on-air. 

A newsreader in Pakistan appeared live on air with her young daughter to protest the rape and murder of an eight-year-old girl in the country.

“Today I am not Kiran Naz,” she said.

“Today I am a mother. That’s why I am sitting with my daughter.”

The death of Zainab Ansari, who was abducted and sexually assaulted in the Punjab region of the country, has sparked multiple protests throughout Pakistan.

“It is true that a child’s corpse is the heaviest,” Naz told viewers of news channel Samaa TV.

“Today Pakistan is buried beneath the burden of the little one’s funeral.”

The Independent has more on the story; you can read it here

Women in Saudi Arabia are making history by entering football stadiums for the first time 

Women across Saudi Arabia are now allowed to watch football from stadium stands for the first time in history.

The historic move was marked by female spectators entering the King Fahd Stadium in Riyadh (the nation’s capital) today (Friday 12 January) to watch teams Al-Ahli take on Al-Batin.

The change allows for all unaccompanied women to enter stadiums in three major cities – Dammam, Jeddah and Riyadh.

The new move follows on from women now being allowed to drive in the country as of September 2017. The move is part of a social reform plan for the government’s Vision 2030 programme.

BBC has more on the story; you can read it here

Images: iStock / Rex Features