Visible Women

Women’s Daily Dispatch: The news you need to know on 17/4/18

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Susan Devaney
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As part of our Visible Women initiative, stylist.co.uk brings you the Women’s Daily Dispatch: your daily digest of international news relating to women. It’s the good, bad, inspiring and urgent stories you need to know from around the world, all wrapped up in one bitesize piece.  

In tonight’s Dispatch: Senior Nasa engineer, Alison McIntyre, has spoken out about why the first person to set foot on Mars should be a woman; a new study has found that being on an equal financial footing to your partner may be the key to a long lasting relationship; trainee barristers have been warned about the consequences of not applying to a dress code set by the BPP University Law School; and journalists, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey of The New York Times, have been awarded the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service Reporting.

Why the first person to set foot on Mars should be a woman 

Nasa astronaut Karen Nyberg also commented on the disappointing reality of how many women get put forward to visit other planets.

Senior Nasa engineer, Alison McIntyre, believes the first person to set foot on Mars should be a woman.

It’s been 40 years since Nasa selected their first female astronaut, but there’s still never been a woman on the moon – and so, McIntyre reckons it’s time women got their chance to walk on a different planet.

Her career with Nasa has spanned nearly 30 years, and McIntrye recognises that although there’s been an encouraging increase in how many senior positions are now occupied by women, male astronauts still seem to be favoured for the most high-profile space missions.

“My centre director is a woman, my former division chief is a woman, we have female astronauts, but we haven’t put a woman on the moon yet, and I think the first person on Mars should be a woman,” McIntrye told BBC News.

Nasa astronaut Karen Nyberg also commented on the disappointing reality of how many women get put forward to visit other planets.

“When I was selected as an astronaut in 2000, I thought that might be a realistic possibility that we would be the next to go to the moon, so it’s unfortunate we weren’t,” says Nyberg.

Visiting Mars is said to be the space agency’s next focus, and we will be watching updates about which astronauts will be selected for the mission.

Read more on the story at BBC News

Why couples who earn the same salaries are less likely to separate

Contrary to popular belief, money might actually buy us happiness.

A new study, conducted by researchers at Cornell University, has found that being on an equal financial footing to your partner may be the key to a long lasting relationship.

Not only are couples who earn a similar salary more likely to get married, but they’re also more likely to stay together for the long haul.

“Equality appears to promote stability,” says Patrick Ishizuka, the study’s lead author. “Equality in men’s and women’s economic contributions may hold these couples together.”

By exploring the ways that money can affect a relationship, the study delved deeper into the ‘marriage bar’ theory. Basically, the theory suggests that couples are more likely to get married after they’ve achieved a certain level of wealth, together.

In terms of gender equality, the study also found a comparable difference when it comes to ‘traditional’ male and female roles in society. Couples who live together first before tying the knot, were found to have more egalitarian views, than couples who go from not living together to marriage.

“It’s really the couple’s combined resources that seem to matter,” concludes Ishizuka.

You can read more on the story here

Trainee barristers told they will be marked down for wearing short skirts

Students could have between one and three points deducted from their exam results if they fail to adhere to rules. 

Trainee barristers have been warned about the consequences of not applying to a dress code set by the BPP University Law School. 

The school, located in London’s Holborn, has enforced a set of extremely conservative rules on students, claiming that failure to meet the prescribed dress code will result in a loss of exam points.

Students on the Bar Professional Training Course could have between one and three points deducted from their exam results, if they fail to adhere to rules - such as failing to have their jacket done up or by wearing colourful socks.

The document, obtained by website Legal Check, has posted images of the handbook, showing constrictive guidelines for both genders. Female students are prohibited from wearing a “too much undone” shirt because “cleavage should not be on show”. In fact, points will be deducted based on how much skin is showing, with a glimpse of a bra amounting to the docking of three points.

In an archaic move, women are also enforced to wear skirts below the knee, with anything above resulting in the deduction of two points. But arguably the most bizarre rule of all, is the defining of any boots that have buckles, straps or a stiletto heel as “kinky”, therefore making them off limits.

You can read more on the story at The Guardian

Two female journalists win joint Pulitzer for Weinstein exposé

Journalists, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, have been awarded the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service Reporting.

Journalists, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey of The New York Times, have been awarded the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service Reporting.

The pair have been credited as exposing Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, and subsequently revealing decades of sexual harassment and assault allegations against him (all of which he denies).

The investigations sparked the #MeToo movement, and further investigations regarding sexual assault in other industries.

Pulitzers are the most prestigious honour in American journalism.

A worthy award for both journalists and their courageous reporting, but also to all of their sources who bravely spoke out.

You can read more on the story over at CNN

Throughout 2018, Stylist is raising the profiles of brilliant women past and present – and empowering future generations to follow their lead – with our Visible Women campaign. See more from Visible Women here.  

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