Visible Women

Women’s Daily Dispatch: The news you need to know on 3/4/18

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Susan Devaney
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As part of our Visible Women initiative, stylist.co.uk brings you the Women’s Daily Dispatch: your daily digest of international news relating to women. It’s the good, bad, inspiring and urgent stories you need to know from around the world, all wrapped up in one bitesize piece.     

In today’s WWD: Ryanair’s gender pay gap report reveals a disparity of 72% - the worst in the airline industry; women in China are cleverly using an emoji to avoid censorship; and a 17-year-old girl, named locally as Tanesha, was shot for “no reason at all” in a drive-by shooting in North London on 2 April.

Ryanair reveals gender pay gap of 72% between men and women 

Only eight of Ryanair’s 554 UK-based pilots are female, while women make up more than two thirds of the cabin crew.

As companies prepare to file their gender pay gap reports before the deadline (4 April), Ryanair’s submission has revealed a gender pay gap of 72% - the worst in the airline industry.

Only eight of Ryanair’s 554 UK-based pilots are female, while women make up more than two thirds of the cabin crew.

The company revealed that the median hourly pay among its 1,182 UK staff is 71.8% lower for women, and the median bonus pay for women was 3% lower.

Ryanair said: “Like all airlines, our gender pay in the UK is materially affected by the relatively low numbers of female pilots in the aviation industry.

“In recent years, the number of female pilots applying to Ryanair has increased and we are committed to developing this welcome trend. It is a feature of the aviation industry that more males than females choose to enter the pilot profession.”

The Ireland-based company have yet to reveal how they aim to tackle the gender disparity.

In comparison, EasyJet, one of the first airlines to report, has vowed to recruit at least one in five new female pilots by 2020 to help combat their 45% gender pay gap.

Read more on this story at The Guardian.

Girl in London shot for “no reason at all” named as Tanesha 

Friends said the girl was shot from a car on Chalgrove Road in Tottenham for “no reason at all”.

A 17-year-old girl, named locally as Tanesha, was shot for “no reason at all” in a drive-by shooting in North London on 2 April.

Friends said the girl was shot from a car on Chalgrove Road in Tottenham for “no reason at all”.

Tyesha, 21, who knew Tanesha, told the BBC she was “just chilling with her friends” when she was shot.

“The car just pulled up and just started shooting,” she said.

“Her friend came banging on my door so I came out quickly. I even tried to save her - had to, had to.”

She said the gunshot wound, below the victim’s breast, was not immediately visible and it looked like she was “having a fit”.

“I put her on her side and I was just rubbing her back, saying ‘Everything’s going to be OK’. I just can’t believe it - so young. It’s ridiculous now.”

The UK capital has now surpassed New York City in its murder rate this year for the first time in history. The Met Police have launched 47 murder inquiries since the start of 2018.

Read more on this story at BBC News

Feminists in China are using an emoji to avoid to censorship 

Women in China are fighting back by cleverly using emojis. 

The ban of Feminist Voices, a social media group with over 180,000 followers which was founded in 2009, is the latest move from the Chinese government to silence women’s voices in China.

But, the women are fighting back by cleverly using emojis as a kind of code to discuss women’s progress. Since they can no longer use the #MeToo hashtag, they’re instead sharing #RiceBunny, along with an emoji of a rice bowl and bunny face emoji. When spoken aloud the words for “rice bunny” are pronounced “mi tu,” a homophone that cleverly evades detection.

“The movement has the potential to become large-scale, which is one of the reasons why the government sees this group of young feminists as a threat to Communist rule,” says Leta Hong Fincher, a founding member. 

Read more on this story here

Throughout 2018, Stylist is raising the profiles of brilliant women past and present – and empowering future generations to follow their lead – with our Visible Women campaign. See more from Visible Women here.  

Images: Unsplash 

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Susan Devaney

Susan Devaney is a digital journalist for Stylist.co.uk, writing about fashion, beauty, travel, feminism, and everything else in-between.

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